Walk On The Wild Side

NATURE'S FUCKING AWESOME.
sciencesoup:

Badass Scientist of the Week: Caroline Herschel 
Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) grew up in Germany, as the daughter of a professional musician. Her father gave all his children a broad basic education in art, music, and science. His wife did not approve of educating her daughter, and when her father died, Caroline’s mother put her to work in the kitchen. Caroline had had several childhood diseases that had left her slightly disfigured, and her mother didn’t think she’d be good enough to marry, so she settled on a life of housework for her daughter.  Meanwhile, one of Caroline’s older brothers, William Herschel, had moved to England, where he was working as a composer and music director, and built telescopes in his spare time. When he found out that his mother had put his sister to work as a servant, he invited Caroline to move in with him in England. She did, and quickly got a successful career as a singer. While Caroline stayed with William, he made a discovery that would change both of their lives. Using a telescope he built himself, William Herschel discovered the planet Uranus in 1781. He was hired by King George III as “King’s Astronomer”, and quit his music career to devote all his time to science. Caroline helped him out, first by cleaning lenses and taking notes, but later with astronomical observations of her own.  She discovered a number of comets, including one that was named after her, and as reward for her work, the state paid Caroline a regular stipend, making her the very first woman to receive a salary for scientific work. 
Guest article written by Eva, who writes about scientists/musicians on easternblot.net and on Tumblr as MusiSci

sciencesoup:

Badass Scientist of the Week: Caroline Herschel

Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) grew up in Germany, as the daughter of a professional musician. Her father gave all his children a broad basic education in art, music, and science. His wife did not approve of educating her daughter, and when her father died, Caroline’s mother put her to work in the kitchen. Caroline had had several childhood diseases that had left her slightly disfigured, and her mother didn’t think she’d be good enough to marry, so she settled on a life of housework for her daughter.  Meanwhile, one of Caroline’s older brothers, William Herschel, had moved to England, where he was working as a composer and music director, and built telescopes in his spare time. When he found out that his mother had put his sister to work as a servant, he invited Caroline to move in with him in England. She did, and quickly got a successful career as a singer. While Caroline stayed with William, he made a discovery that would change both of their lives. Using a telescope he built himself, William Herschel discovered the planet Uranus in 1781. He was hired by King George III as “King’s Astronomer”, and quit his music career to devote all his time to science. Caroline helped him out, first by cleaning lenses and taking notes, but later with astronomical observations of her own.  She discovered a number of comets, including one that was named after her, and as reward for her work, the state paid Caroline a regular stipend, making her the very first woman to receive a salary for scientific work.

Guest article written by Eva, who writes about scientists/musicians on easternblot.net and on Tumblr as MusiSci

(via scienceyoucanlove)

ichthyologist:

Atlantic blue marlin larva (Makaira nigricans)
In one spawning, the female blue marlin may release up to 7 million eggs, each approximately 1mm in diameter.
The planktonic young may drift in the pelagic zone and may grow as much as to 1.6cm in a day.
© Cedric Guigand

ichthyologist:

Atlantic blue marlin larva (Makaira nigricans)

In one spawning, the female blue marlin may release up to 7 million eggs, each approximately 1mm in diameter.

The planktonic young may drift in the pelagic zone and may grow as much as to 1.6cm in a day.

© Cedric Guigand

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Today my favorite animal is the jackdaw.
Photo from WikiCommons

Today my favorite animal is the jackdaw.

Photo from WikiCommons

earth-song:

Blossom is a rare species of Australian bat who recently came into care following a suspected cat attack. Thanks to Bat Conservation & Rescue Qld, she recovered and was eventually released back into the wild. Read her story and see lots of compelling photos, today onZooBornshttp://bit.ly/14Jp2Yf

(via scienceyoucanlove)

texasmonthly:

“I never thought of marriage as something only for men and women. But I’d never marry a guy I didn’t like.” Willie Nelson on gay marriage, read the whole exclusive interview on texasmonthly.com! #willie #gaymarriage #humanrights Photograph by Gary Miller (at Texas Monthly)

texasmonthly:

“I never thought of marriage as something only for men and women. But I’d never marry a guy I didn’t like.” Willie Nelson on gay marriage, read the whole exclusive interview on texasmonthly.com! #willie #gaymarriage #humanrights Photograph by Gary Miller (at Texas Monthly)

(Source: texasmonthly.com, via peaceoflove7)

Leopard Seal completely destroying penguin. HOLY BALLS

Leopard Seal completely destroying penguin. HOLY BALLS

The Rondo Dwarf Galago. Listed as a Top 25 most endangered primate. Endemic to coastal Tanzania. The species is known to be found only in eight isolated forest patches. Information from edgeofexistence.org, <— Click there to read more! Photo from WWESO

The Rondo Dwarf Galago. Listed as a Top 25 most endangered primate. Endemic to coastal Tanzania. The species is known to be found only in eight isolated forest patches. 

Information from edgeofexistence.org, <— Click there to read more! 

Photo from WWESO

Oh shit a gang of manatees.
More Manatees!!!
Photo by Paul Nicklen 

Oh shit a gang of manatees.

More Manatees!!!

Photo by Paul Nicklen 

Geckos have such good grip that they can stick to slick, wet surfaces. Studying their feet could help people create materials that can adhere even while wet. Watch a video of some geckos sticking to some wet stuff, and read more about it all HERE. All this spanks to National Geographic. 

Geckos have such good grip that they can stick to slick, wet surfaces. Studying their feet could help people create materials that can adhere even while wet. 

Watch a video of some geckos sticking to some wet stuff, and read more about it all HERE. 

All this spanks to National Geographic.